101 Great Minds

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Nick Street, VP Global Integrated Marketing at Vans.

“Music is a form of creative expression. As a brand, you have to honour that, meaning you have to understand where the music comes from; otherwise, you’re abusing culture. Musicians don’t make music to be on an advert; they create music to evoke an emotion. As a brand, it’s your duty to be aware of that.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Nick Street, VP Global Integrated Marketing at Vans.

“Music is a form of creative expression. As a brand, you have to honour that, meaning you have to understand where the music comes from; otherwise, you’re abusing culture. Musicians don’t make music to be on an advert; they create music to evoke an emotion. As a brand, it’s your duty to be aware of that.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Nick Street

VP Global Integrated Marketing at Vans

 

“Music is a form of creative expression. As a brand, you have to honour that, meaning you have to understand where the music comes from; otherwise, you’re abusing culture. Musicians don’t make music to be on an advert; they create music to evoke an emotion. As a brand, it’s your duty to be aware of that.”

 Nick Street, VP Global Integrated Marketing, Vans

 

Nicholas Street has been part of Vans for over 16 years and has been with VF Corporation for over 19 years. He joined Vans as a marketing coordinator and quickly rose in the ranks to different managerial positions. He is currently the Vice President, Global Integrated Marketing. In addition to taking up various international executive positions within Vans, including in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the US, Mr. Street’s multigenerational and multicultural expertise remains highly vital in building and establishing Vans as a brand. Nick is not only a multitalented mastermind, but also intrinsically, a creative genius.

Uli Reese: Talk a little bit about your role at Vans.

Nick Street:
My title is integrated marketing at a global level. With my team, we look after the marketing strategy and its execution of that around the world, from the corporate side all the way through to our consumer experience, the messages we create, campaigns, events, ambassadors and the athletes that we work with, so it’s advanced in strategy, but it quickly moves into action as well. We’re a little unique in that we don’t work often with outside agencies. We’re very much a brand that is driven by, I would say a roll-up-your-sleeves-and-get-it-done approach. We built the brand organically. Vans is one of the pioneers of grassroots marketing. We often say we’d rather build a skatepark than run a TV ad, and that flows through the brand.

Reese: How important is audio in building the Vans brand?


Nick:
Music has always been a part of my identity as much as being a part of the skateboarding culture, so I’ve grown up with the two. I’m lucky I’ve been able to make my hobby my job. Music has always been a part of the brands that I’ve worked for, as well as being a core pillar. At Vans, because of the cultural connection through skateboarding, music has always been there. It’s fascinating to see how many of our skateboarders are musicians. We also have a lot of our athletes play instruments and a lot of the musicians we support who also skate. They’re by no means interchangeable, but they’re certainly heavily connected.

Reese: Why has audio become more dominant in recent years?

Nick: One, I would say how we consume music has really changed. Growing up, I listened to a lot of different music, from classical to hardcore to heavy metal, but that wasn’t how many of my friends were consuming music. Now in the digital age, kids are jumping from Disney’s Frozen to Travis Scott on Fortnite, so being into one genre or just being beholden to the record collection of your parents has gone. The other piece is how we consume music and then how much is being consumed. We’re now a lot more exposed. 

Reese: Would you agree that a brand is judged today on its authentic relationship with music?

Nick:
Our journey started at the grassroots. The Vans Warped Tour ran in the US for over two decades, and by the time we finished, it was the longest touring festival in the world. The interesting thing for me is when Steve Van Doren tells the story about how he got involved in the tour, it wasn’t about putting a banner or branding on the stage. He said he wanted to be with the bands backstage. He wanted to cook for them, give them our product and give new bands a chance to play – and that has really stuck. For us, it’s more important to create that emotional connection with the artist and to build that relationship. We don’t sponsor stages, events or festivals. I think for some people, that’s fine, but for us, the stakes are a lot higher. What has evolved over the last five years, with the increase of having to produce digital content, is that everything needs to have audio. Years ago, it would be the experience itself; you would go to a concert, have a DJ playing music, and it was in the background. Skate videos have always been like that; the skate park is just as important as the song. There was no internet, and you couldn’t look up what it was. We would record the sound of the skate videos so that we could listen to the soundtrack of the video. What has really changed is that now you have to be more deliberate around the visual message you put out and look at how that matches up with the sound.

Reese: What’s the evolution of audio in branding at Vans then when talking about a sonic DNA?

Nick: The reason we don’t have a sonic playbook at this moment in time is because we’re a legacy brand. We’ve been around for over 50 years, and for nearly half of that time, we’ve had something like the Warped Tour, but today it’s not the only skateboarding culture or subculture wearing our brand. Music, because it is so emotionally connected to how you feel, takes you to a certain place. We’re so much more than just punk rock as a brand. Even internally, we’re more than just one genre. So yes, you need an identity, but how do you ensure that identity is open and that the connection you continue to form every day with your consumer is open and flexible enough to evolve? From a branding perspective, you need to know who you are. The beauty for us is that we are born out of youth culture and popular culture. If we create something with an artist that becomes part of popular culture, and as long as we’re open and listen to our athletes and skateboarders and what they bring to Vans, our product evolves in the same way that our brand evolves. 

Reese: Do you think it would be dishonest to have a sonic DNA for Vans?

Nick:
Our purpose is to inspire and enable creative expression, and we continue to double down on that. We run a global platform called Musicians Wanted, which at its core is a battle of the bands. We have big acts but also want to give the opportunity to smaller acts, so we used our platform and gave them the three hours before the main act comes on to be discovered. Since then, it’s grown organically because in every country our marketing teams saw the opportunity. We’ve started relationships with artists through these platforms that we’re still in touch with. You can connect with us as a brand just like you would make friends in a bar or at a festival. We want to be a brand that is authentic, approachable and inclusive. That then can then evolve to the point where your music, or you as a musician, will organically be part of our next advertising campaign.

“Our purpose is to inspire and enable creative expression, and we continue to double down on that.”

Reese: It’s true that people are emotional attached to this brand…

Nick: We bring people together. It’s about creating a community, and when the community come together, something bigger happens. We had one of our skateboarders who, because of how he expressed himself, wanted music specifically written for his video. So, we put the perfect clip of him skating on in the studio and had musicians live score it.

Reese: Is there a brand you admire?

Nick:
Music is a form of creative expression. As a brand, you have to honour that, meaning you have to understand where the music comes from; otherwise, you’re abusing culture. Musicians don’t make music to be on an advert; they create music to evoke an emotion. As a brand, it’s your duty to be aware of that. The worst thing you can do is to pick a piece of music because it’s popular or because you are trying to chase more likes or views. You have to come from a place of authenticity.

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Elodie Dufrane, Group Communication, Global Head of Brand, Advertising & Sponsoring at BNP Paribas.

“In the end, any person should be able to recognize the brand without seeing it.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Elodie Dufrane, Group Communication, Global Head of Brand, Advertising & Sponsoring at BNP Paribas.

“In the end, any person should be able to recognize the brand without seeing it.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Elodie Dufrane

Group Communication, Global Head of Brand, Advertising & Sponsoring at BNP Paribas

 

“In the end, any person should be able to recognize the brand without seeing it.”

 

 Group Communication, Global Head of Brand, Advertising & Sponsoring, BNP Paribas

 

 

Elodie Dufrane is the Global Head of Group Communication Brand, Advertising and Sponsoring at BNP Paribas. She is an Exco member of the Group Communication Team. She manages a team of 30 and coordinates all local teams with regards to brand, advertising and sponsoring across all businesses and territories. She works with key partners like Publicis, Havas, TBWA and KR media & their subsidiaries locally. She oversees branding and is involved in numerous brand projects across the organization. Elodie is also head of Advertising for the Group. She manages tennis partnerships for the Group and is also in charge of the data media ecosystem. For the past 2 years, Elodie oversees the defining of all guidelines related to responsible communication (beyond advertising).

Reese: Can you talk a little bit about your role at BNP Paribas?

Dufrane:
I`m in charge of everything related to brand, advertising and sponsoring for the Group, from strategy down to the implementation worldwide.

My first key role is defining the Brand strategy and positioning it in line with the company’s purpose and the bank engagement strategy (particularly around Sustainable Finance and positive Banking), and deploying them in all entities.

The second role is to manage all advertising of the group. Within advertising, I`m also in charge of key decisions and deployment of the data media-ecosystem of the group, be it in terms of global tools or partnerships.

In the sponsoring area, I particularly ensure our sponsoring brings added value beyond pure sponsorship by developing key engagement projects in line with the group engagement strategy.  

Finally, I am thrilled to lead what we call internally the “responsible communication guidelines program “. A key topic in aligning our communication activities with the group purpose.

Reese: How important is music in branding?


Dufrane:
To me, it`s definitely an important asset of the overall brand architecture and will be even more important in the future. Obviously, a strong brand is one that lives by its purpose, actions, and the decisions made are key and drive engagement. Still, a strong brand can only be so if it remains consistent over time and consistent across its channels (its own channels or others through disintermediation). Brand items are, for that reason, key as they greatly contribute to establishing this positioning over time and across touchpoints. The music is a part of it, and beyond music, sound globally (music and voice) is. Voice and music together can reflect the personality of the brand and definitely drive a sentiment, ideally the most in tune with the group positioning. With brand sound, it is the same. In the end, any person should be able to recognize it without seeing it. Nowadays, we spend a lot of time looking at smartphone screens. But for how long? We need to make sure that we have our personality reflected everywhere, through an ear-set as well as on phone. That`s why consistency is very important, as we are reaching our customers in so many different ways nowadays.

Reese: When you look at the digital age, how important is voice, sound and music going to be?

Dufrane: As I said, it`s definitely going to become more important. It is already more important than it was a year ago, especially after the digitalization progress over the last year. We need to have our own voice to be recognized, and we need to start now to be able to keep up with the changing environment. Podcasts are growing, Hologram technology is coming, and other technics will probably see other needs. But in any case, it`s very hard to create a great video without sound – at least emotionally! It is hard to recognize a brand without its logo. The more digital brands become, the more important ‘’being human and personality” will be.

Reese: Should brands treat sound as disciplined as visuals?

Dufrane:
We used to be very disciplined with our brand guidelines, our websites, prints, videos, advertising mechanisms. Nevertheless, we’ve allowed some flexibility, especially in the digital area. And even more so, over the past year: before the pandemic, one had to react quickly, be agile. This can only be enhanced if we provide simple guidelines and brand management tools. Our job is to serve the brand in terms of homogeneity but also facilitate the work for any users. In that respect, sound is no less different. I admire those brands that manage to create a brand sound and use it on every single touchpoint. We are not there yet. This is not easy to achieve, especially not in companies made of multi-local entities. Hence, knowing the difficulty of getting there, you probably need to be even more disciplined: one always has their own preferred music style. Thus, you need discipline but also a system that allows agility by using a flexible adaptation mechanism.

In particular, working with a sound producer to produce “THE sound” of the group, and its many different versions to satisfy all needs, but also a partner able to rapidly produce variations of it for different upcoming applications.  So yes, discipline but not coercion.

Reese: You have to have a master plan.

Dufrane: Yes, as I mentioned, this masterplan needs to be flexible as well, as we have to adapt the content locally to different countries. The music we are using in France might be different from the music we are using in other countries (or at least its version is). When we do ads for France, for instance, I say from the beginning that music is key; it needs to be there from the start. Having Brand music helps in that case. But for some ads, it needs to convey the feeling and bring the right emotion, and we could be tempted to put something else instead.

Reese: I agree, but this is not the way it is usually handled by brands. Most of the time, music is seen as an afterthought and pushed all the way to the end of the timeline.

Dufrane:
I think before you go into the process of commercials, you have to take a close look at the brand itself and make sure it`s stable. This always needs to be the first step. We are building strong data resources for data-driven decision-making to support our actions. On that side, we have great branding guidelines on many different touchpoints. We do also have some guidelines for sound (not for voice), but as I said, advertisers might be tempted to put something else, something more in line with the ad itself. And this does not reinforce your brand recognition. This is why it`s easier to incorporate them in the process at the beginning and derive a version of your sound in a way that both ensure brand attribution and harmony with the commercial itself. They need to be worked out very carefully and close to the brand.

“Sound is quite important. It has to fit the brand positioning, the purpose of the group. As for the other elements of the brand guidelines, consistency is important. That`s why I believe brands need not only a consistent positioning, but also a consistent sound. Music, sound and voice, if well-chosen, of course, will open doors. It`s one key to build trust and relationships. Sound can reinforce even further the human element into the banking industry.”

Reese: No matter which brand, all of them are in the trust-building business. Brands, can`t buy trust, only earn it. Sometimes, even the smallest mistake can be fatal.

Dufrane:
This couldn’t be more true, especially for the banking sector, suffering from low image consideration. Trust is the first important element that we have to consider in the banking business, and it’s quite integrated with our DNA. In that regard, thinking long term is key. Long term with your partnerships, long term with your customers, the choice of sound is quite important. It has to fit the brand positioning, the purpose of the group. As for the other elements of the brand guidelines, consistency is important. That`s why I believe brands need not only a consistent positioning, but also a consistent sound. Music, sound and voice, if well-chosen, of course, will open doors. It`s one key to build trust and relationships. Sound can reinforce even further the human element into the banking industry.

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Andrew Garrihy, Chief Marketing Officer at DiDi.

” Regarding consistency, the core function of a brand is to become trusted. If you change your personality every time, I don’t trust you because you’re not genuine. This is an extension of that. With sonic, ultimately, I think we’ve probably been distracted by other things and forgotten the importance of this sense.“
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Andrew Garrihy, Chief Marketing Officer at DiDi.

” Regarding consistency, the core function of a brand is to become trusted. If you change your personality every time, I don’t trust you because you’re not genuine. This is an extension of that. With sonic, ultimately, I think we’ve probably been distracted by other things and forgotten the importance of this sense.“

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Andrew Garrihy

Chief Marketing Officer at DiDi

 

“Regarding consistency, the core function of a brand is to become trusted. If you change your personality every time, I don’t trust you because you’re not genuine. This is an extension of that. With sonic, ultimately, I think we’ve probably been distracted by other things and forgotten the importance of this sense.”
 

Andrew Garrihy, Chief Marketing Officer, DiDi

 

Andrew Garrihy is the Chief Marketing Officer at DiDi International Business. Prior to joining Didi International Business, Andrew held various senior executive positions within renowned companies, including Huawei, Qualcomm, Samsung and Vodafone. Mr. Garrihy’s brilliant execution plans are recognizable; he has won distinguished awards such as the Cannes Gold Lion, Marketing Director of the Year, and Brand of the Year. Extremely talented and results-driven, Andrew Garrihy remains an authority figure in the industry.

Uli Reese: What is your role at DiDi?

Andrew Garrihy:
Formerly at Huawei, I’m now the Chief Marketing Officer at DiDi for all international markets outside of China. My focus is on helping DiDi build a world-class brand, and one that’s immediately about to expand. We’ve currently got a great presence in Latin America and are a leader in China, but we want to bring these benefits to the rest of the world.

Reese: Why has audio gained dominance in the last three years?


Andrew:
Voice is the most natural way of communicating we have. Now with the proliferation of technology it’s becoming more important because technology, is getting to a point where all of our screens will be connected. If you think about the overwhelming visual stimulus, we face every day, and how we filter brilliantly, I think what sound is doing is so simple because it cuts through it all so beautifully. Sound is the ultimate transportation vehicle and not just in space but in time. We can hear a sound and be transported instantly to our childhood, or I can hear the sound of a souk from Marrakech and be transported to when I was last there. I don’t think there’s any other stimulus that can do that. Also, sound is one of the greatest anchors to unlock emotion or emotional recall. That’s why we’re seeing a rise of sonic influence, and it’s only going to get bigger.

Reese: Consistency is key, but so many brands opt for using pop culture, which has merit but isn’t made for longevity…

Andrew: As we learn the importance of consistency in the visual, we also need to learn the importance of consistency in this world because otherwise it’s like a leaky bucket. If we don’t have the consistency it’s all running out at the bottom. I’m probably as guilty as others because I’ve looked in the past to borrow attributes from other people’s music or work by licencing other music because we thought that was the right way to do it. I still think there are some benefits in that – but that’s like changing a visual identity every week, right? We all know it’s a bad idea. Again, regarding consistency, the core function of a brand is to become trusted. If you change your personality every time, I don’t trust you because you’re not genuine. This is an extension of that. With sonic, ultimately, I think we’ve probably been distracted by other things and forgotten the importance of this sense.

Reese: Then along comes AI. If I knew 100% what you were thinking, I could change your buying behaviour…

Andrew: AI has enormous potential. I want to quote composer Lucas Cantor from Huawei’s Unfinished Symphony project (Cantor completed Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony No. 8 using AI technology) because he calculated it beautifully. He talked about the AI as the ultimate collaborator; it never got tired, never complained. It just had endless ideas. That model is really interesting because what we keep hearing being asked is how do we get consistency but enable creativity and flexibility? So that’s one level. The next level is much more challenging, it’s how do we use mathematics or music, and the algorithms, to generate the right result at the right time and still be distinctive and consistent? I think it’s immensely possible, but like all machine learning, it’s going to take training and practice.

Reese: Is being late to the party down to being uneducated, or do we just need more iconic cases that people can refer to?

Andrew:
Part of the challenge is the way brands are being built. Historically, brands were based on an old-fashioned model, which was in the pre-purchase phase with lots of big advertising, but it’s not as effective anymore. Brands have to be built through the entire customer experience. Many of our agencies and marketers are still in that first phase, but things are moving on. Look at Tesla; they’re building their brand in the product in the post-purchase, so that when I think of a sonic identity it’s got to be present in every part of the experience, in short form and long form content and user generated content. It’s got to be present and flexible enough to work in every part of the consumer experience. It’s complicated, but that’s where we need flexibility, creativity and balance with real consistency – and that’s challenging.

Reese: Consumers want to see authenticity. They don’t want brands to merely jump on the bandwagon…

Andrew:
Audiences, especially younger people, want to be moved and inspired. We all want a credibility transfer, and to some degree it works, but I think authenticity is absolutely critical. Audiences now want brands to inspire them, so that’s the challenge. There are still times and places where we can look for credibility transfer as we try to build strong memory structures and emotional hooks in those memory structures. The question is how to do the creative work that reaches people. That’s harder and riskier because we don’t have a lot of time or the perfect formula. We’ll fail many times before we get it right. 

“I think key for truly great brands in the future is how we really add value, not just to our consumers but to society.”

Reese: So what conclusions can you make?

Andrew:
I think key for truly great brands in the future is how we really add value, not just to our consumers but to society. Going back to an AI project we were researching at Huawei, we explored how we might help Alzheimer’s patients to re-live moments of pure joy through music. One of the concepts we explored was the potential to use facial recognition and emotional recognition responses generated by playing them songs from a time gone by. By monitoring their facial expressions, the AI would learn which ones generated the happiest emotions and would then start finding those songs. It’s really exciting, and has potential far in excess of what many of us are probably thinking about even today.

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Dr. Sebastian Rudolph, Vice President Communications at Porsche.

“I would like to finish by reiterating that audio is key because it’s primal and goes back to when we were born. Porsche is in the trust-building business, and the first sense with which we experience trust is by hearing our mother’s heartbeat. That’s undeniably powerful.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Dr. Sebastian Rudolph, Vice President Communications at Porsche.

“I would like to finish by reiterating that audio is key because it’s primal and goes back to when we were born. Porsche is in the trust-building business, and the first sense with which we experience trust is by hearing our mother’s heartbeat. That’s undeniably powerful.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Dr. Sebastian Rudolph

Vice President Communications at Porsche

 

“I would like to finish by reiterating that audio is key because it’s primal and goes back to when we were born. Porsche is in the trust-building business, and the first sense with which we experience trust is by hearing our mother’s heartbeat. That’s undeniably powerful.”

 Dr. Sebastian Rudolph, Vice President Communications, Porsche

 

 

Dr Sebastian Rudolph is the Vice President Communications, Sustainability and Politics at Porsche AG. Prior to joining the company, he held various senior positions within distinguished companies, including Bilfinger, the Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure and Bavarian Television (ARD Network). An industry mastermind and an alumnus of Georgetown University, Dr Rudolph is working towards significantly transforming Porsche’s communication strategies.

Uli Reese: Tell me about your role at Porsche.

Sebastian Rudolph: 
I’m responsible for several great areas: starting with communications and all its different forms, externally and internally, followed by sustainability – dealing with stakeholders in this field – and ending with governmental affairs.

Reese: The car world has a wonderful history with all things visual, but how do you see audio evolving in the industry and, with podcasts and autonomous driving in mind, how important is it?


Sebastian:
Audio starts before we’re even born. The first thing we hear is our mother’s heartbeat. So, we all begin this life with sound, and it evolves continually through our lives. It’s always there, and audio has been given a strong push over the last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. You mention podcasts, so let me give you an example of the functioning ‘ecosystem’ we have at Porsche. For instance, since the 1950s we have the printed Christophorus magazine for customers and friends of the brand. Over the last couple of years, we’ve been offering a very attractive digital version of the Christophorus as well. Secondly, we have our online Newsroom coverage and a lot of video content – such as the web TV magazine 9:11. In August 2020, we launched the Porsche Podcast. If you want to compare the different milestones within this ecosystem, it started with print 70 years ago, and it’s now being propelled forward with podcasts. In fact, the Next Visions x HoBB podcast also began during the pandemic, in 2020.

“Porsche is in the trust-building business, and the first sense with which we experience trust is by hearing our mother’s heartbeat. That’s undeniably powerful.”

Reese: The relationship between cars and sound is changing, at least with the whisper of electric vehicles. How is Porsche addressing this, in terms of the consumer experience and the potential economic consequences?

Sebastian: There are several reasons why people fulfil the dream of buying a Porsche. Firstly, it’s the brand itself – it is very much rooted in trust, perfection and emotion. One sees the brand and makes the basic assumption that a Porsche will be the best sportscar one can purchase. Secondly, it’s the timeless design that Porsche offers. If you see a 911 from the 1970s, you know that it’s the same timeless design as it is today. So, if you want to own a 911, you know what you’re getting. Although the design has changed over time, there is a thorough line with the brand that is unique. When it comes to audio, there is a typical Porsche sound. We recently had the world premiere of the new 911 GT3, and you just know that if you were to start the engine and listen, you’d fall in love. Ten years ago, it would have been just the same. This is the traditional 911 style.

Reese: What about the sound of the Taycan – the first all-electric sports car from Porsche?

Sebastian:
With electric cars, there is a new game to play.  Our engineers had to think hard about how the Porsche Taycan should sound. They developed a very futuristic soundtrack, which also had to be authentic: the result is pure Porsche, but in an electronic age. If you were to start and drive a Taycan ten years from now, you would always remember the sound. That’s the power of audio.

“If you test-drive a fully electric Porsche, it still feels like you’re driving a Porsche. You have that 100 per cent Porsche feeling.”

Reese: If you look at best practice cases in branding, the 911 is a great example. But many CEOs ask what’s the best practice case in sonic branding, where the visual is so strong. There are very few good examples, but I would have to go with James Bond. What are your thoughts on this?

Sebastian: Well, I have talked about the Porsche Podcast and about authenticity. We created a key visual for the podcast – with the 911. All eight generations of the 911 are timeless, right? We then created an audio logo inspired by the Taycan, combining the traditional and new. If I were to ask what Apple’s ‘audio logo’ is, the answer would be that they don’t have one because it doesn’t matter – they make what are probably the best products in the world. It’s like the 911: we have this timeless design atop a key visual. But what’s the sound logo? If you were to start the engine, you’d know.

There are some powerful brands delivering powerful and innovative products featuring timeless designs, which absolutely works. Sound is an opportunity for some brands to lift up, and for others, like Apple and Porsche, there is still an unmet need. If they could create a powerful sound logo as well as offering timeless design and a super product, then ‘bam’ they’ve hit the next level.

Reese: The VP of Design at Google, Ivy Ross, said: “If you don’t have confidence in yourself to figure out what that Sonic watermark is, it’s much easier to grab something that will make you popular, like a hit tune or a pop star, but it doesn’t last over time – culture changes.”

Sebastian:
On the subject of confidence, I’m with Ivy. In the world of sport, if your confidence, technique, mental and physical fitness aren’t there, you’d better not go out on to the pitch. It’s like that in business too. As for borrowing identity, at Porsche, we try to stick to a sound that genuinely fits our DNA. If I take a chart song, this might be a good step because it’s in the charts, and so many people love it. But does it fit the brand and what I am trying to communicate? I don’t know. So, we look first at the DNA of our product and our culture and then at what audio might fit both. If you can nail that, then you’re there.

Reese: Mark Phillips, who is VP at McKinsey Digital Labs, said: “My analogy is that a sonic logo is like a name badge, while a DNA-driven sonic identity is like meeting somebody in person.”

Sebastian:
Nicely put. I think that says it all!

Reese: Thank you so much. Before we sign off, do you have any final thoughts to leave us with?

Sebastian:
I would like to finish by reiterating that audio is key because it’s primal and goes back to when we were born. Porsche is in the trust-building business, and the first sense with which we experience trust is by hearing our mother’s heartbeat. That’s undeniably powerful.

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Toby Southgate, Worldwide CEO at Brand Union.

“The connection between words, pictures and music is incredibly powerful and delicate, but nobody appreciates the cost of taking care of the music part properly.”
480 497 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Toby Southgate, Worldwide CEO at Brand Union.

“The connection between words, pictures and music is incredibly powerful and delicate, but nobody appreciates the cost of taking care of the music part properly.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

TOBY SOUTHGATE

Worldwide CEO, Brand Union

 

“The connection between words, pictures and music is incredibly powerful and delicate, but nobody appreciates the cost of taking care of the music part properly.”

 

 Worldwide CEO, Brand Union

 

 

As the Worldwide CEO of Brand Union, Toby Southgate manages all of Brand Union’s international teams and collaborates with other WPP agencies in an effort to continue to build truly global client brands. Southgate has been with Brand Union since 2008, and has held a number of roles within the agency, including Managing Director of Brand Union Middle East, CEO of Brand Union UK and most recently, CEO of the Americas. In his latest role, he helped grow the agency’s footprint facilitating the acquisition of Epigram – a Brazilian branding, identity and communications agency in 2014. Southgate has been a key player in the agency’s business development over the last eight years, bringing in major clients like The Coca-Cola Company, Shazam, GlaxoSmithKline and CBRE. A man not unfamiliar with the inside of an airplane, Southgate has lived in six different countries. He was born in London and educated at Millfield School and The University of Edinburgh, where he studied economics and history.

Reese: You don’t have an audio department at Brand Union, is that correct?

Southgate:
Correct. We’re not a huge business. Having everything in-house would be out of scale for us. We’re part consulting function, part creative agency.

Reese: Why is it that a lot of brands are so arbitrary when it comes to their audio? They’re very disciplined visually, but sonically, they’re all over the place. Why is that?


Southgate:
I think brands have always cared about semiotics – the visual codes of recognition, and these are largely driven by color. If you think of a green beer – that’s Heineken. If you think of a red and white soft drink – it’s Coke. Very few brands have succeeded at the sonic equivalent. Maybe Intel… the Intel ‘Ping’ is a sonic code. What brands haven’t done is create music that has become popular in contemporary culture. Brands historically invest in visual codes and equities first.

Reese: But our ability to remember a melody is way more advanced than our ability to remember visuals. In the late stages of their illness, Alzheimer’s patients still recall songs from their childhood. We’re not doing music justice for what it achieves in the process. It’s something most of my interviewees in the first edition of the book acknowledged.

Southgate: I’m sure they would also acknowledge that the world in which they work is now on a device, a machine, more than it is on broadcast TV or in print. In an environment where you can influence through sound and audio, and through music, the creative product has changed a little, but it hasn’t been a revolution to the point where they’re thinking about sound and music first. I just finished reading the autobiography of Moby, the musician. He’s an artist, a thinker, overall just a very creative person – but the thing he ultimately became famous for is when he made an album that sought commercial success. He chose to license every single track from the album, specifically for the purpose of licensing for advertising, TV content, a movie soundtrack. Does that mean he was abandoning his artistic integrity? Was it a business decision? I wonder if there’s a classic battle between creativity and art.

“What brands haven’t done is create music that has become popular in contemporary culture. Brands historically invest in visual codes and equities first.

Reese: There is, but it has changed compared to twenty or thirty years ago, when producing music for advertising was seen as ‘selling out’. That’s in the past. Today, it works – look at Red Bull, look at Coca-Cola, and their collaboration with musicians. Horseshoeing an audio logo on top of your brand, a five-note motif, that’s in the past. I often compare brands to people. I think a brand’s behavior is comparable to a human being’s behavior – the style, the way they move, the way they talk, and, of course, the way they sound. That’s important for a brand. A brand has its own unique DNA.

Southgate:
It also has to do with heritage… the brand and the business have to recognize the value and importance of authenticity and credibility. That’s what connects with the contemporary consumer.

Reese: It’s like Adidas’ relationship with Run DMC… the band didn’t get paid by Adidas for their song ‘My Adidas’. There’s honesty to that relationship, and that is very hard to reproduce. A simple endorsement deal won’t achieve that, because with endorsements, the brand is just looking for a quick credibility transfer from the artist to the brand. Consumers don’t want that anymore.

Southgate: I agree. In the past, things could be – in some ways – fudged over and glossed over. But we’re in a world of complete transparency now, you can find the answer to any question you like. There’s no hiding place anymore. So consumers become more alert to authenticity and credibility. You can find out immediately where a brand has come from. What is the Rudi Dassler story? What is the Adi Dassler story? What is the Mark Parker and Nike story? Where did these people come from, why are they able to build and lead relevant and interesting brands and businesses?

Reese: With that in mind, what do you think is going to be important for brands in the future?

Southgate:
Loyalty is hard to earn. And consumers are more fickle and more willing to experiment than ever before. They have more choice. So what we do to help brands succeed in the future is to help them understand a couple of major themes. One of them is how they can get comfortable with ambiguity. You can’t predict whether a brand will still be relevant, still be growing, still be attractive in the future. But if brands and businesses are comfortable acknowledging that they don’t have all the answers, that they don’t know what future holds in detail, but that they are ready with authenticity and credibility to lead organizations through periods of unpredictable change – that is very powerful. Also, a brand has to be able to define why it exists. Take, for example, Blake Mycoskie. He founded Tom’s shoes, and invented the ‘buy one, give one’ mentality – where you buy a pair of shoes from Tom’s, and they give a pair of shoes to a child in need. Versions of that model have been taken over by other companies. There’s an authentic purpose to the mission of that brand. Brands and businesses, even in toxic categories, need to have relevance for culture. It’s about how you connect to the world around you. You need to build a relationship with the humans and the audiences and the organizations you choose to align with, then take accountability and responsibility for your choices.

You have to be prepared to be judged by your successes or failures, and also willing to adapt to change and reiterate much faster than organizations have been able to in the past. Then you can build a relationship that is relevant to the consumer.

Reese: When a client comes to you, would you advise them to be as disciplined sonically as they are visually?

Southgate:
That’s an interesting question. My ‘dream client’ conversation would be one where the client is open to seeing their brand and their business as a collection of almost unlimited experiences. Any brand you choose to engage with today, you do so on your own terms. You choose the purchase channel. You choose the mode of usage. You choose the frequency of purchase. And my agency’s view is very simple: Brands are defined by the experiences they create for people. By default, most of our clients first want to have a conversation about visual equities, visual assets, and control. But we have to be able to extend the conversation into all the other experiences that they may or may not have considered. Those experiences no longer sit in a function called “marketing.” It’s what I call the consumer journey, the audience journey – an audience that includes your shareholders and also every single employee of the brand, by the way. Brands live inside organizations, and that is just as important as their outside existence. The potency of unifying an organization around its core purpose, its core ambition, is very indicative of a powerful and unifying thought, that is likely to influence and take people on a journey.

Reese: When you act in your role as a brand consultancy, how do you respond to clients asking what they should do about their audio? Have you been asked that question before? What are the main challenges?

Southgate:
Well, one is the challenge of appreciation: Audio is an asset of value, which brands and organizations could and should invest in. And then there’s an issue of quantum and cost – how do you create audio assets that can become as important and relevant a component as your brand experience and your visual assets? These things don’t often get considered together. Everyone in your previous book will have an experience of using an audio asset while pitching an idea, and the connection between words, pictures and music is incredibly powerful and delicate, but then nobody appreciates the cost of taking care of the music part properly. Whether you’re originating content, because you need something that can stand up alongside licensed content and become as relevant or resonant for you, or the pure cost of licensing something that is recognizable. My wife is a sound engineer, and she was constantly briefed by advertising agency as follows: “I want to use X piece of music, but I can’t afford the licensing, so I want you to create something that sounds a bit like it.” Which is of course utterly destructive to a brand experience. People know. The reaction is “Oh, is that an Iggy Pop track? No, it’s a crap, tinny, instrumental-on-a-keyboard version of an XX track”.

Reese: It’s like promising lobster and then delivering imitation crabmeat.

Southgate:
Exactly! That’s a great analogy. But I also think it’s an example of the transparent flow of information that I mentioned. If you as a brand or a brand owner are discovered as having ripped off a piece of music by The Rolling Stones, or the XX, or Calvin Harris, then that’s a negative experience for your consumers. Wherever you sit along that brand’s engagement journey, you’re not going to have a good opinion.

Reese: That’s why I’m saying that brands should team up with these artists, to create a soundtrack that fits the brand.

Southgate:
I wonder how many artists became successful because they were pushed by organizations or brands. We’ve all sat in restaurants and hotels beforehand, pre-Shazam, and asked: “What’s this music?” Now you Shazam it, and it’s instant gratification. But you also make a judgement on whether that’s a positive or a negative experience.

Reese: It’s also interesting to see that in other environments, like retail. You can steer how long people are staying, if they are going to buy anything, et cetera – just by the choice of music that you play.

Southgate:
That’s interesting. You’re right. The world of communications is the wrong way round when it thinks advertising has to come first. If the first thing you address are the visuals and a tagline, you know, that’s trying to live in a house before you know what materials you’re going to use. Olfactory is hard to create and deliver, obviously. But it isn’t hard to deliver a piece of music, especially nowadays, as it exists electronically. It’s something the brand should own, and should think about.

Reese: We’re in trust-building business. As a brand, I can’t buy your trust. And I can very quickly lose your trust. It’s comparable to lying; you can tell subconsciously whether I’m lying once my voice doesn’t match the expression on my face. Even if I’m a really good liar, there’s something you detect on a subconscious level. Likewise, as a brand, it’s really important to be consistent at the audio consumer touchpoints.

Southgate:
That is a critical component of authenticity. Great brands are synonymous with and defined by experiences, and they understand that those experiences are a collection of sensations – whether visual or audio, or olfactory – and every single one of them has to be considered and has to be beautifully connected to the other. That’s success. They all have to be brilliantly designed, written, or brilliantly delivered through music. So that notion – brilliantly designed and beautifully connected – is a very potent driver for me for the organization we want to be and all the work we want to do for our clients. And I think that the unfortunate thing, as much as brands have become defined by visual assets, they have also become synonymous in our world with a logo, a badge. That’s as far removed from the future of powerful, effective, evocative, emotional connections with brands as I can imagine. So my desperate hunger for Brand Union is that all of our people and all of our clients think about that.

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Monica Rustgi Mody, VP Marketing, Budweiser.

”Music is another dimension for people to feel what your brand is.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Monica Rustgi Mody, VP Marketing, Budweiser.

”Music is another dimension for people to feel what your brand is.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Monica Rustgi Mody

VP Marketing at Budweiser

 

“Music is another dimension for people to feel what your brand is.”

 

 Monica Rustgi Mody, VP Marketing, Budweiser.

 

 

Monica Rustgi Mody is currently the Vice President of Marketing for Budweiser. During her time on Budweiser, the brand has seen restored and sustained brand health trends for the first time in 10 years.  During her time, Budweiser’s creative work, which includes the last four Super Bowl campaigns, collectively has been awarded a total of ten (10) Cannes Lions, six (6) Clios Sports awards, and nine (9) Clio awards.  All such work has landed Monica on Ad Age’s “40 under 40” as well as being deemed by Ad Week as one of the “30 Most Powerful Women in Sports”. Prior to working at Budweiser, Monica held a career in the music industry both as a recording artist and producer, signed to Grammy Award winning producer Cory Rooney.  She has also written and produced for Jennifer Lopez and Pitbull during her time in the music industry.  From there, she attended MIT Sloan School of Management, where she earned her MBA.

Uli Reese: What is your role at the brand?

Monica Rustgi:
I lead marketing at Budweiser. My job is to put out work that is creative, and that builds people’s hearts for Budweiser. It’s everything from a Superbowl spot to a sign in the store as you’re buying the beer. It’s about bringing the brand to life so that it disrupts beyond being just a liquid in a can.

Reese: Your background is in music. Tell me a little bit about that.


Monica Rustgi:
I was born to Indian immigrant parents and spent my childhood singing Indian classical music, even competing nationally. I played the sitar, the tabla and the piano. Once I got to 16, I wanted a social life, so I stopped. I went to Business School in New York, but while I was an undergraduate, I realised I didn’t want to sit at a desk and crunch numbers. I took a year out and, in that time, met my production partner. I made a demo, and before the end of that year, I had three major label offers. In my final year of school, I recorded my album and started writing for other artists, including Jennifer Lopez and Pitbull. I had a song called 100 Dollar Bill that had c-list success. But I came to a point where I was tired of being the brand. I was creative and liked to reach people, so the next best thing was marketing. I joined ABI and have been with them for seven years. I get to work with amazing artists and put out albums with every new campaign. Music and creativity are part of everything I do.

Reese: How important is music and sound in building a brand?

Monica: It’s another dimension for people to feel what your brand is. It can play different parts. It can be a support piece or be highly dynamic, but I don’t think it’s valued enough as a point of distinction. The biggest hurdle is that not a lot of people understand music or speak the language of music.

Reese: How do you combat the fact that music is often seen as an afterthought?

Monica:
In the same way you take a full hour to discuss a treatment and which directory you are going to use, there should be an actual meeting about audio. It’s so important that it’s not rushed at the end because that means a decision is made on cost. We have productions where we make sure we discuss music, like a Superbowl spot, because music plays a huge role and is a huge investment. But just because you can’t afford the perfect song, if you bake in the time, you can actually get something that is just as strong.

Reese: CMO’s don’t like relying on music companies and licensing because they are being told they cannot own but rent. Should that change?

Monica: First and foremost, music is complex. Publishers, songwriters, label and producers are all competing for attention. But I think labels today have it wrong. Back in the day, there were maybe ten legends popular at any time, and today it’s one person every four or five years. Lady Gaga comes to mind. Labels used to have all the power, but they don’t anymore. They need us. If we offer a Superbowl spot that’s going to get millions of views, the labels should give us the music for free. It’s short-sighted not to because of the digital life they go on to have. That longer exposure turns into concert tickets sales, and they would ultimately make way more money.

Reese: Do you think brands should have a sonic style guide?

Monica:
I think the more you can codify something, the better. Everyone then has a shared language to articulate what they are thinking. Then when they can’t afford the music, or the label is charging too much for a well-known song, they have a clear way to brief a composer or creative. Many times, the creative team asks me to speak to the audio engineer because I speak better to music, but sometimes even I don’t have the right repertoire.

Reese: How important will sonic identity be in the future?

Monica:
People are already evolving to audio; look at the boom in podcasts and audiobooks. There are so many distractions, and music is a compelling way to get people’s attention. How that comes to life is tough to know. Brands sometimes feel that in order to feel relevant, they must create something new every time, but that’s not necessarily true. I think it just needs to be interesting enough to hear over and over. 

Reese: Is there a trust building factor when it comes to audio?

Monica:
We’re living in an age where people like to hear the things they’re familiar with. Because of how we digest media, we can tune out very easily now, so if you’re transported to a place where it doesn’t take a lot of effort to recognise something, it’s a plus.

“We’re living in an age where people like to hear the things, they’re familiar with. Because of how we digest media, we can tune out very easily now, so if you’re transported to a place where it doesn’t take a lot of effort to recognise something, it’s a plus.”


Reese: How do you view the idea that smart speakers will be the consumers and decision-makers of tomorrow?

Monica:
It goes back to anything that makes life easier, but I think they will be. It’s scary because it will make us less patient. Interestingly, in this quarantine world, we’ve been brought back to basics, but I think this will happen. I just don’t know when.

Reese: Why are brands so late to the sonic party?

Monica:
I have an Alexa and probably use two percent of its potential. When I think about why brands have been slow to pick this up, I think the reason is that it’s tough to quantify the impact of music. When we test ads, we should also be testing the music. But it’s so subjective, and people are still figuring it out.  

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Craig Lyon, Senior Brand Director, North America at Nike.

“Would love your thoughts on what quote to use given the updates! Turned one piece below blue that could be good, but you tell me once you’ve had a read.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Craig Lyon, Senior Brand Director, North America at Nike.

“Would love your thoughts on what quote to use given the updates! Turned one piece below blue that could be good, but you tell me once you’ve had a read.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Craig Lyon

Senior Brand Director, North America at Nike

 

“Multitasking, especially for today’s youth, is no longer multitasking, it’s life. Everyone is doing, and listening to, four, five, six things at once, all the time. The ability for brands to cut through the literal noise and trigger a response is something only audio can do.”

 

 Craig Lyon, Senior Brand Director, North America, Nike

 

 

Craig Lyon, a ten-year Ex-Nike marketing veteran, is a charismatic global business leader with year-over-year success in driving brand affinity, consumer demand and growth through game-changing brand initiatives and a natural ability to unify and energize diverse teams. His journey with Nike started as an internship that led to opportunities in advertising, digital platform design, social media and brand management before taking on leadership roles in the Global Basketball and North America marketing teams.

Uli Reese: Can you talk about your previous role at Nike.

Craig Lyon:
In my role as a territory lead at Nike, my team was responsible for bringing brand activations, communications and retail experiences to life across the central United States and Canada. Not only were we bringing global brand messages and services to consumers across our region, especially through digital platforms during the pandemic, we also reverse-engineered that process by mining stories from our marketplace to share up and out with the world. Our ability to leverage the global power of the brand to lift, aid and propel the pursuits of individuals in our communities was without question my favorite part of my time in territory.

Reese: How important is the sense of hearing in terms of brand building?


Craig:
Consider this, the first form of trust children develop is the sound and recognition of their mother’s voice.  So even before birth, your ears are the instruments developing feelings of comfort, of safety.  Now think about the way brands build messaging, especially in film.  In my experience, it starts with the question; what is the emotion we’re trying to draw out of you? What are we trying to help you to understand, believe in, believe that we believe in? Then most turn to finding the right words, the right music, the right V/O artist with the right the pacing.  All of this can happen before seeing any real visuals in the creative process.  Not only that, but these audio components become the elements brands are willing to pay for.  Because if they are wrong, the message stands no chance. You could write the most beautiful song lyrics the world has ever known, but if you put the wrong instruments and rhythm behind it, it simply won’t deliver the way it does on paper. I’ve always loved being a part of briefing sessions where music is used during a read along. By using audio in these early stages to stir up emotions in the creative team that you hope consumers will feel, you give them real feelings to run with as they dive into the work.

Reese: Agencies feel pressure when they show a campaign to a client to walk in with a piece of pop culture. Why?

Craig: Not having worked at an agency, I won’t pretend to know the origin of this pressure from experience.  But I imagine it’s often self-inflicted and rooted in preconceived expectations of the results, often quantitative, the client wants.  Ironically, I say that because I’ve found that clients often misstep in agency briefings with similar preconceived expectations, in this case, expectations of what the agency wants in a brief.  Ultimately going too deep and hindering the creative freedom that allows breakthrough work to come to life. 

Reese: Do you agree that Nike leverages pop culture?

Craig:
Sure, that’s fair to say.  I’d also add that brands like Nike have the ability to create pop culture on their own accord if their willing to put in the work.

As the athletic and sportswear industry leans further into the arts and fashion, the best partnerships will be focused on the creation of new pop cultural currency, vs. latching on to whatever is at the top of the charts. Those who build genuine partnerships from the inside out that fuse the values and creativity between two parties to create pop culture will rise above the noise of others hitching a ride on the energy of someone else’s resonance with their desired consumer.

Reese: It is easy to lose a sense of the brand when you pivot towards pop culture…

Craig: Absolutely, but for me during my time with Nike, the center point of the brand and our work was always sport and specifically the athlete.  Pop culture was, and still is, a source of energy and storytelling, but it was never on equal footing with sport. I’ve always believed this unwavering commitment to sport is Nike’s great advantage and distinguishing factor against the competition.

“Multitasking, especially for today’s youth, is no longer multitasking, it’s life. Everyone is doing, and listening to, four, five, six things at once, all the time.  The ability for brands to cut through the literal noise and trigger a response is something only audio can do.”

Reese: Do you see audio growing in importance in branding?

Craig:
My daughter is just over a year old, and she knows the sound Netflix makes when we turn on the TV to play her cartoons.  As soon as she hears it, you’re likely to see her drop what she’s doing, walk to her little chair and sit down to tune in.  Even this early in her life, she can immediately recognize the meaning of the sound, along with countless others, and trigger a response.  Multitasking, especially for today’s youth, is no longer multitasking, it’s life. Everyone is doing, and listening to, four, five, six things at once, all the time.  The ability for brands to cut through the literal noise and trigger a response is something only audio can do.

Reese: You said at the start that sound is the first experience of trust. Can you expand on that?

Craig: 
Beyond sound being the first foundational building block of trust for a child, it’s wild to think about how dependent we are on audio as a superior trigger to action in our everyday lives.  Seeing the fire truck, even with all its lights flashing, requires you to be looking up and in the right direction to know it’s coming.  But when those sirens go off, you immediately understand what’s happening and can take action before ever seeing the truck. 

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Doug Zarkin, Omni Channel Chief Marketing & Brand Officer at Pearle Vision.

“The “in” of “innovation” stands for insight’. You would be a fool not to appreciate the power of audio /sonic in your marketing today. Recognise that you will always be chasing innovation from areas such as this, but chase it with a plan, driven from an insight.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Doug Zarkin, Omni Channel Chief Marketing & Brand Officer at Pearle Vision.

“The “in” of “innovation” stands for insight’. You would be a fool not to appreciate the power of audio /sonic in your marketing today. Recognise that you will always be chasing innovation from areas such as this, but chase it with a plan, driven from an insight.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Doug Zarkin

Omni Channel Chief Marketing & Brand Officer at Pearle Vision

 

“The “in” of “innovation” stands for insight’. You would be a fool not to appreciate the power of audio /sonic in your marketing today. Recognise that you will always be chasing innovation from areas such as this, but chase it with a plan, driven from an insight.”

 

 Doug Zarkin, Omni Channel Chief Marketing & Brand Officer, Pearle Vision

 

Recognized as a global strategic retail and brand marketing expert, Doug Zarkin has led the transformation of Pearle Vision’s (A division of Luxottica) global strategic marketing, digital platform, visual merchandising, product promotion, and retail footprint. During the course of his career, Doug has earned an impressive array of honors for his marketing and brand building work including; ANA Genius Award, Brandweek’s Constellation Award, a Silver Clio Award and multiple Effie Awards. Doug was recently named a Retail Innovator Award Winner and was recognized by his peers as Top 40 Over 40 and Innovative Marketer of The Year by The CMO Club. He’s previously been named “Marketer of the Next Generation” by Brandweek.
His public presence includes appearances on all of the major broadcast networks and business publications and frequently lecturers on the subject of brand marketing at many top universities, such as Harvard, NYU, Duke, Cornell, Xavier, The George Washington University, Miami of Ohio, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His work at Pearle Vision is currently the subject of a Harvard Business School case study on brand rejuvenation.


Reese: Tell me about your role at Pearle Vision.

Doug Zarkin:
I am the Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer for Pearle Vision, responsible for all consumer-facing activities relating to the brand; all advertising, customer relationships, marketing, our entire digital platform and our product promotion strategy. Anything that seeks to connect the brand and attract new and retain existing consumers falls under my purview.

Reese: How important is voice, music and sound in branding in your experience?


Doug:
In a cluttered media marketplace the opportunity to break through and resonate is something that all marketers are looking for. A brand like Pearle Vision was looking to romance our story and make an emotional connection. Pearle has an iconic jingle – ‘nobody cares for eyes more than Pearle’ – actually I wouldn’t even call it a jingle, I would call it an audio mnemonic that I brought back in 2015 from the early eighties and 90’s.. It elicits nostalgia for what we stood for then and what we stand for…genuine eye care. The integration and modernization of that audio has been an incredibly important branding signal. We’re now working with an organisation to help us create the right environmental tracks for a four-walled experience. An eye exam and finding that perfect pair can take anywhere between 30 minutes to an hour so creating the right atmosphere is incredibly important.

Reese: Talk a little bit about how you revived that process?

Doug: As part of my on-boarding with the business I wanted to take a couple steps backwards to our heyday in the eighties and 90’s before charting the course forward. In looking at the asset pool of what our prime target audience (GenX-ers) remember, one of the things was the iconic Pearle audio mnemonic. I felt strongly that it was a way to speak to our heritage as a market leader without overdoing it. A jingle can bring back a vivid memory for somebody so I was pretty aggressive in my desire to bring it back. We’ve kept the integrity of the audio intact but we’ve modernised it. We use different instrumentation and we use different pacing. You don’t have to create something from scratch in order to create something new. We had this set of notes and we’ve put a modern take on it.

Reese: Can you expand on the way you’re working with a company to create your point of sale environment?

Doug:
We’ve provided them with a really good diagnostic on who our target audience is, both demographically and psycho-graphically. We’ve given them certain keywords and cues that we want the patient in our Eye Care Center to understand and appreciate about our brand. They look to match up a mixture of music and genres to help create that environment. It’s absolutely an art not a science.

Reese: In terms of voice, does Pearle Vision have its own voice?

Doug: Our brand really focuses on an archetype that we call the ‘chief health officer’; female, head of household, making the health and wellness decisions. The right voiceover and audio can create depth, frivolity and passion. Also, a big part of our brand is local radio because these are voices that connect with consumers at neighbourhood level. There isn’t a single voice for Pearle Vision that we use because frankly there isn’t a single consumer that we go after.

Reese: What would you advise fellow CMO’s if they are unnerved by the growth of sonic?

Doug:
The first thing I would say is take a deep breath. Don’t operate your marketing platform on FOMO a fear of missing out. I don’t ascribe to the belief that you have to have a single environment strategy. Consumers are not living in the world of Alexa for example, nor are they living in just the audio world. They are exposed to multiple degrees of stimulus. Those that are driving themselves crazy trying to figure out what their audio positioning is first must ask themselves what the Alexa or Google platforms are delivering today or possibly tomorrow for your business? There’s this unnecessary panic that you have to have one. No, you don’t at least not yet. 

“As you approach opportunities like sonic and audio, recognise that its power lies in its ability to help accentuate the emotional connection required to help drive that emotional decision in your favour.”

Reese: So what do you see when you look at the future of sonic?

Doug:
We’re evolving into a more hands-free access climate for almost everything digitally. If I sold consumables I would want to have a strategy where somebody could say, ‘Google or Alexa order me X’. [But the way, my Alexa has just kicked on as I said this!] But it shouldn’t be a one dimensional aspect of your marketing plan. So my answer is to say that you would be a fool not to understand the power of sonic in your marketing today but recognise that you will always be chasing innovation but chase it with a plan, driven by an insight.

Reese: Is there anything else you want to say before we wrap up?

Doug:
Yes, and it’s a statement that has helped guide the evolution of Pearle Vision. It’s this: people make emotional decisions before they make rational choices. A consumer is going to emotionally decide to trust you. They are going to trust you with their money and in our case trust you with their eye care before they make a rational choice to visit you. As you approach opportunities like sonic and audio, recognise that its power lies in its ability to help accentuate the emotional connection required to help drive that emotional decision in your favour.

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Jill Baskin, CMO at Hershey Company.

”It’s important that you think about sound and to your point; you must have an appreciation, you can’t just slap it on. You must understand how it works.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Jill Baskin, CMO at Hershey Company.

”It’s important that you think about sound and to your point; you must have an appreciation, you can’t just slap it on. You must understand how it works.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Jill Baskin

CMO Hershey Company

 

“It’s important that you think about sound and to your point; you must have an appreciation; Sound can’t just be slapped on. It needs to have a defined role, a strategic reason for being used.”

 

 Jill Baskin, CMO Hershey Company

 

 

Jill Baskin is the Chief Marketing Officer of The Hershey Company.
A marketing genius at heart, Ms. Baskin’s in-depth expertise has seen her land in high-profile lists, such as the Top 25 CMOs in the World list. Prior to joining The Hershey Company, Ms. Baskin was the VP of Global Brand Strategy and Communications for Mondelēz International, where her creative excellence transformed famous global brands such as Oreo, Honey Maid, Club Social, Cadbury, Trident, TUC and many others.

Uli Reese: Tell me about your role as CMO of The Hershey Company?

Jill Baskin:
Different CMO rules have different groups reporting into them, but ours is very communication-based. We have an in-house agency that was created in the time that I’ve been here, and we have media and design reporting into the structure.

Reese: Looking back over your career, how important has sonic been in terms of brand building?


Jill:
It’s funny because I thought I hadn’t done much in the area of sound, but I now realise that isn’t entirely true. When I was a brand-new AE, I had two really formative experiences at Leo Burnett; I worked on the United Airlines account and the two brilliant creative directors Greg Taubeneck, and Bud Watts called the account team into their office, and Greg pulled out a vinyl record that he’d got from the local library – that’s how long ago it was. He put it on and said this is going to be the new advertising for United Airlines. It was Rhapsody In Blue by George Gershwin. That was in 1980, and it’s still being used. It was right at that moment when airlines had been deregulated, and United needed to go after business travellers. We also had a campaign running where we told stories on radio and used the actor Gene Hackman. This was before actors were commonly used for advertising, so these were two formative experiences where I really learned about the power of sound.

Reese: What do you think about the dominance of audio now, and where do you think it’s going?

Jill: We haven’t used audio that much at Hershey partially because the screenless ecosystem you’re talking about is irrelevant to us. Alexa is not an impulse purchase medium, but Amazon online is, so when you’re making a grocery list and shopping on Amazon then it becomes more important. People don’t tend to use Alexa and say, ‘Add Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups to my order’. It’s just not a habit, but maybe it will be in the future. Right now, a visual cue is more effective. For instance, when I joined the company, they were showing the Reese’s cups as a whole cup. It was computer-generated imagery, and I changed it to a photograph of the cup with a bite taken out of it. Everyone said, ‘That’ll look too messy’ and I actually had to do a shoot to show them how attractive it could be and it increased our sales dramatically. That visual cue for a product like candy, where you almost need to be just a little naughty to buy it, is so strong. Maybe there’s an auditory cue for that, but visual is so strong I haven’t had to. Music that tracks behind some of the advertising has brought a certain relevance to the work; a Kraft campaign is still running to this day, and it’s 11 or 12 years old now. We used the song Spreading a Little Love by Life Size Humans for Philadelphia Cream Cheese, and it’s still running. It just feels so right and provided a really strong for the cue for the brand. 

Reese: A study says that 70% of Gen Z don’t look at a track a brand uses instead, they look at how a brand deals with music, or how authentic they are…

Jill:
It feels the same way with voiceovers too. Mercedes-Benz uses Jon Hamm’s voice – and he has a lovely voice and is a good storyteller – but to me, there is no connection between those two. On the other hand Ving Rhames for Arby’s saying ‘We have the meats’, is just so perfectly done and the most authentic connection of human uttering a line. That, to me, is where you’ve gotten your money’s worth using a celebrity.

Reese: Pop culture is often used as a placeholder in lieu of a better decision-making process. Does that resonate with you?

Jill:
It does, and it doesn’t. On one hand, Rhapsody in Blue was not an expensive piece of music, and it wasn’t a popular piece of music, but it fit the campaign. Same with Spread a Little Love. I think when you make that argument in a boardroom, it works. What doesn’t work is a board that hasn’t been thought through. We’re working on a campaign right now that I think is a really interesting idea which is a love song that translates the relationship between parent and child for Hershey Kisses. So thinking about famous love songs and there was one that spoke to me when my first child was young, which was Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered. I remember looking at the baby and thinking exactly that. It’s a love song – and wasn’t meant as romantic love – but it felt like the right thing in regard to my child. It’s so simple, and it so perfectly matches. To me, selling two or three songs like that is a sales job, and I will lay it back on the agency to prove the worth of the song.

“It’s important that you think about sound and to your point; you must have an appreciation; Sound can’t just be slapped on. It needs to have a defined role, a strategic reason for being used.”

Reese: Should there be a shareable sonic brand book?

Jill:
It makes sense. I live and die by my visual identities, and we’re very strict with them at Hershey, so that makes all the sense in the world to me. However, I’m mostly annoyed by sonic identities as a consumer. To me, it should be entertaining and something that I am happy to hear that reminds me of the brand. It almost feels in this day and age, that they put a chip in my head with these little three notes. Right now, one that I do love is Cruisin’ the Smoky Robinson track for Allstate Drivewise about smooth driving. Every time I hear it, it makes me smile.

Reese: The three-second mnemonic it’s an old idea now. There is no best practice case although, I cite James Bond as an example of a benchmark for sonic that can be identified in two seconds…

Jill:
That’s what I’m talking about. As a client, I found that working with people who understand the music is important. I come from a musical family – my dad’s a musician – so I know how important it is. Mcgarrybowen has put a lot of money into their music department, and having people involved who are musicians and who also love music. It’s important that you think about sound and to your point; you must have an appreciation, you can’t just slap it on. You must understand how it works.

Reese: Do you see sonic branding as something The Hershey Company may embrace further moving forward?

Jill:
We touched on it a little bit earlier but sometimes having sounds  associated with your brand are hard. We have a Kit Kat jingle, ‘Give me a break’, from the sixties that has bedevilled us. We’ve tried to update it, but people love it. It’s meaningful to them, and it holds a place in their lives. Getting rid of something like that is hard. You have to know when to keep it and when to get rid of it.

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Amandine Robin, Senior Vice President North America, Communications & Sustainability at Pernod Ricard.

“While digital platforms used to be mostly about text, now video, music, and audio have taken over to give people a fully immersive experience.”
384 384 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Amandine Robin, Senior Vice President North America, Communications & Sustainability at Pernod Ricard.

“While digital platforms used to be mostly about text, now video, music, and audio have taken over to give people a fully immersive experience.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Amandine Robin

Senior Vice President North America, Communications & Sustainability at Pernod Ricard

 

“While digital platforms used to be mostly about text, now video, music, and audio have taken over to give people a fully immersive experience.”

 

 Amandine Robin, Senior Vice President North America, Communications & Sustainability, Pernod Ricard

 

 

Amandine Robin assumed the role of SVP, Communications, Sustainability & Responsibility for Pernod Ricard North America in October 2016. In her current role, she manages both corporate and brand communications. Her goal: to enter iconic brands such as Jameson, Absolut, and G.H. Mumm into the cultural zeitgeist – from media, digital, to TV shows and movies.

Uli Reese: Let’s start by looking at the importance of music in branding…

Amandine Robin:
When you think how branding has evolved from when all you had was newsprint in black and white, we are now able to connect with consumers on a completely different level. Music can give your brand a unique quality, particularly as consumers are increasingly engaging with their ears, not their eyes.

Reese: Is voice factored into your customer experience at Pernod Ricard?


Amandine:
For some of our brands, it is paramount. Absolut Vodka is a great example where we’ve done several big integrated partnerships with Swedish House Mafia and more recently with the pop star Lizzo. In both of these cases, their newly released songs worked hand in hand with one of our newly released products. With Swedish House Mafia, it was the iconic “Greyhound” song and music video which was released simultaneously as our “Absolut Greyhound” bottle. In the same timeframe, Absolut also provided a unique experience to concert-goers as the band went on their world tour. With Lizzo, we connected with her just before she became the well-known pop artist she is today and partnered on her “Juice” song, which happened to coincide with our “Absolut Juice” product release.

Reese: How did you choose Lizzo and Swedish House Mafia for these campaigns?

Amandine: It’s not a linear process. It starts with culture and consumer insights. In the case of Absolut, it meant understanding what Gen Z and millennials care about: their frustrations, passions, and what is happening in their world at the moment. We have tools and teams dedicated to this process. From there, we see who can be the best fit. Lizzo was authentic, spoke her mind, stood for the same values we did as a brand. It was a perfect fit.

Reese: I can detect Absolut out of a million bottles but musically I have no clue what the brand sounds like, except that it associates with pop culture. Has Pernod Ricard ever thought about having a sonic identity?

Amandine:
At the moment, we are doing an in-depth exercise for our brands to uncover their true, timeless, DNA: understanding what they were all about 50 years ago and what they will still be about in 50 years. From there, we can develop truly impactful timely campaigns based on human stories and insights. In that second stage, communicating these stories through visuals and sound will be paramount.

Reese: We are looking at $40 billion in sales in the screenless eco-system by the end of 2021. Is that relevant to Pernod Ricard?

Amandine: Absolutely. Music and sound are playing a much more important role in the new digital age. While digital platforms used to be mostly about text, now video, music, and audio have taken over to give people a fully immersive experience. Not surprisingly, the most popular social media app right now is TikTok, which is based on music and sound. And of course, you also have all the new voice-based technologies such as Alexa and Google Home. They are all built on algorithms, so the question for us becomes: how do you connect with people through voice and be present when they search, look for you and your category?

Reese: Podcasts have exploded. Do you have a take on why visuals are moving over to audio?

Amandine:
Having just had a baby, it was fascinating to learn that hearing is something humans already develop in the womb. Mothers are told to talk to their babies so they will recognise your voice when they are born. Music is also what will calm and soothe a baby at an earlier age, more than the other senses. It tells you that there is something very primal to audio.

“Music and sound are playing a much more important role in the new digital age. While digital platforms used to be mostly about text, now video, music, and audio have taken over to give people a fully immersive experience.”

Reese: Do you think brands should have a brand book for sonic?

Amandine:
Absolutely! The same way a brand currently has brand guidelines in terms of design, tones, values. We can expect that many brands will now think of creating brand “sonic” guidelines both in the digital and physical world.

Reese: Is there a brand you admire?

Amandine:
As we are on the topic of sonic brands, I have to pick Apple, for two reasons. The first is how they have leveraged music for their iconic advertising: always leveraging up and coming artists that explode thanks to them. And second, most importantly, for how much the brand has moved audio forward – from the iPod to the new iPhone.

Copyright © 2021, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

    Join our Newsletter

    We'll send you newsletters with news, tips & tricks. No spams here.

      Contact Us

      We'll send you newsletters with news, tips & tricks. No spams here.

        hotporno.cc Perfect natural tits splattered with creamy sperm - cumshot, teen, sex hotporno.cc My mom has a black cock fetish 280 - interracial, milf, mature hotporno.cc Lusty fucking at the kitchen - sex, cum, teen Hot babe mouth jizzed - blowjob, babe, hardcore Delightful brunette Gela B. does her best to cum - blowjob, teen, hardcore hotporno.cc hotporno.cc Hardcore anal sex. Anal creampie. Big tits wife - hardcore, sex, anal BLACK4K. Interracial coitus of rich babe and her black muscled coach - interracial, pornstar, teen hotporno.cc hotporno.cc