101 Great Minds

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Arne Brekenfeld, Global CEO at MetaDesign.

“The market is well educated in the visual territory and most brands are pretty advanced in creating a distinguished and well managed brand design system. Sound, for many years, was totally underestimated.”
939 939 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Arne Brekenfeld, Global CEO at MetaDesign.

“The market is well educated in the visual territory and most brands are pretty advanced in creating a distinguished and well managed brand design system. Sound, for many years, was totally underestimated.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

AGENCY EDITION

Arne Brekenfeld

Global CEO at MetaDesign

 

“The market is well educated in the visual territory and most brands are pretty advanced in creating a distinguished and well managed brand design system. Sound, for many years, was totally underestimated.”

Arne Brekenfeld, Global CEO, MetaDesign

 

Arne Brekenfeld is leading the brand consultancy MetaDesign since 2010 as CEO. He has multiple years of experience in brand communication, strategic planning and brand building, what makes him an expert in those fields. Arne gained comprehensive management and leadership experience in international operating advertising and branding agencies. His emphasis lays in consulting for multinational or global operating corporations and brands.

Reese: Let`s talk about value in sound branding, which the client never sees at first.

Brekenfeld: We started quite early in 1999 to think about sound and music in branding. We thought about the value of sound, and music for brands, and explicitly, how we can use and develop sound, which has its strategic foundation at the core of a brand. We wanted to develop a proprietary set of sounds instead of just evaluating existing music for its brand fit. At that time brands mostly profited from the popularity of songs and celebrity of composers or musicians. We really started thinking about the core of the brand and what it stands for, and then try to define a process, a way of thinking, how we transfer this into a core theme, sound elements, sound logo and further develop it into a broader, recognizable sound system. In the first stage it was really a laboratory. We often did not know whether we would succeed. But we had good people with a great mix of brand and musician background. We established a sound branding department and the first client was Siemens. The project became extremely successful even though there was no methodology how to do it at that time. Siemens was brave enough to take risk because they had the strong feeling, that sound could be a strong differentiator for their brand. They also believed in a strong systematic approach. So, we pretty much started to adapt the process we had established for visual design. We did everything the first time, and there was no blueprint in the market, how to do it. But we really invented something which in a way, opened up a new growth spectrum for sound branding as a differentiator for brands. We made it popular to talk about this systematic approach. Music is not something that just touches you because you like it, but you can create sounds which are strongly linked to the message that you want to send out. The Siemens story and a couple of good speeches attracted other clients like Allianz and Lufthansa. We really started to have that fundamental conversation in the market with people who were absolutely amazed by the potential for emphasizing and differentiating their brand. 

“Sound was never used strategically on brand level. The implementation of sound in dozens of different touchpoints, has gotten brands to really get it.”

 

Reese: Did these clients originally come to MetaDesign for their visual needs?

Brekenfeld: No, we never did any visual project or work for Allianz, we just did sound. The same with Lufthansa. We started with their sound project and because of its innovative capacity many departments and colleagues were involved. It was a great spirit: once a CMO spontaneously called all the staff together and said, “You all have to come to here, this is the best meeting of the month! Both brands use their sound branding system almost unchanged until today. It is implemented across various touchpoints.   

Reese: What are the challenges you had to face when working with your clients?

Brekenfeld: Sound is still a side topic. It is seen as ad on, so to speak as cherry on the cake of branding. But if you consider the increasing importance of invisible interfaces, i.e. avatars or robots, then sound and voice become incredibly important for brand recognition and expression, perhaps even more important than images. Sounds, music and voice have to be unique and immediately recognizable. The sound system has to be as flexible as possible. The system needs to be open enough to create variety in sounds and music. The most heard killer argument for sound branding systems is that they have too little variability and wear out too quickly. Preventing good sound branding projects are not only clients but also communication agencies. At first, classic ad agencies try to do this by themselves because being creatives, they think it`s their territory. Even a very open and variably designed sound branding system with hundreds of assets are often undermined by agencies because it restricts their sense of creative freedom. Frames and side rails are not as established in sound branding as in the visual brand world. Sound in the agency understanding is to be seen as an amplifier for emotions. Sound therefore primarily supports the story and the creative idea. The relevance of the brand level is often not seen or understood. We see this as our task not to restrict creative freedom or to limit it, but to strengthen the brand perception as much as possible and to ensure recognition. This becomes even more important when the average time spent on a piece of advertising is less than a second today.

Reese: Brands have extremely high visual recall, but zero recall in sound. Where do you think this is going?

Brekenfeld: I couldn`t agree more. On a visual level, many brands are very disciplined, they know about a systematic approach, about defining a DNA. The market is well educated in the visual territory and most brands are pretty advanced in creating a distinguished and well managed brand design system. Sound, for many years, was totally underestimated in its value for the brands, to express certain aspects of the brand. It was mainly used to create a mood and atmosphere and to support the visual story. Sound was never used strategically on brand level. The implementation of sound in dozens of different touchpoints, has gotten brands to really get it. But I think there`s still not enough knowledge about how to do it. Also, sound is a very emotional and individual taste-driven thing, and there are very few people in an organization that really understand and get the value of sound. Sometimes a CEO or CMO likes a song and surprisingly it will appear in the next TV commercial. What often drives the discussion in the right direction is money. Because the media landscape became so fragmented you have to create sound/music for so many different markets, media, devices and applications, of course the cost exploded. The usage rights, reproduction rights, versions, asset production, etc. are so expensive, that companies are looking for a moreefficiently way to create sounds and music. We don´t care if the reasons for a holistic sound approach are financially or efficiency driven. It is the door opener to underline the strategic advantage of an overall sound branding approach. I`ve seen companies that have saved millions by developing their own sound branding system and music libraries.  

Copyright © 2020, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Alexander Ewig, Managing Director Marketing at MediaMarktSaturn.

“Well, actually we’ve won awards for the sound design around our work. The “Life Changing Places” campaign was perhaps the first piece where we spent so much time on sound design.”
939 939 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Alexander Ewig, Managing Director Marketing at MediaMarktSaturn.

“Well, actually we’ve won awards for the sound design around our work. The “Life Changing Places” campaign was perhaps the first piece where we spent so much time on sound design.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

Alexander Ewig

Managing Director Marketing at MediaMarktSaturn



“A sound logo allows us to achieve brand recognition that is independent of the brand name or voice.”


Alexander Ewig, Managing Director, MediaMarktSaturn



Alexander Ewig was the COO of Wunderman Germany before he joined the European consumer electronics giant MediaMarktSaturn Retail Group in 2014. Since he took on the role of Managing Director at MediaMarktSaturn Marketing GmbH in 2017, he has been responsible for the marketing strategies of Media Markt and Saturn, two brands that are known for their distinct voice and catchy taglines.  

Reese: I usually ask my interviewees about the importance of music in branding. In your case, I want to know: How important is voice in branding?
Ewig: It’s extremely important. Voice has always played a huge role in our work, for quite a practical reason: we’ve always done a lot of radio advertising. On the radio, there is no visual component, obviously, so we used the voiceover to create instant brand recognition. We wanted our customers to be able to tell within seconds whether they were listening to a Media Markt spot or a Saturn spot.
Reese: How do you pick the right voice for a brand?

Ewig: We look at the tonality, color, and melody of the voice. We ask ourselves: Do we want a male or female voice? A familiar or an unfamiliar sounding voice? Slight dialect or no dialect? What about aggressiveness and speed of speech? Longevity is an important factor, too. Voiceover artists usually work for several brands in the advertising business. So, in the long run, it is important to check in after some years and evaluate whether the brand voice can still provide the desired effect, that recognizability.

Reese: Media Markt launched its sound logo last year. What made you take this step?

Ewig: There were two reasons. One, we wanted to move away from the voiceover being our only recognizable audio element. A sound logo allows us to achieve brand recognition that is independent of the brand name or voice. Second, we wanted to react to the exponential increase in the importance of audiovisual media, which is being driven by voice assistant systems such as Alexa and Google Home, and also the increasing relevance of podcasts. For us as retail brands, this development is extremely interesting. However, we knew early on that we would do it differently from Telekom’s two-note logo or Audi’s heartbeat sound at the end of each spot. The Media Markt sound logo is fully integrated into the commercial, for instance, a delivery truck honks the melody, or the staff of a Media Markt store play it on the trumpet. It is a key element of the storyline and appears in various acoustic forms.

Reese: Let’s talk a bit about the process. How did you go from “We want audiovisual recognizability” to a finished sound logo?
Ewig: We worked with an advertising agency. We provided a briefing to guide them in the right direction, and they then sought for composers and musicians. The creative process took about five to six months. When they played us the four shortlisted pieces, we saw that they had met the briefing, but we were still clueless about which one would work. I mean how were we supposed to know if our favourite one was ‘the one’? How could we be sure that it had the power to convey brand identity? We would have had to hear it about 5,000 times to answer that question. So we trusted our gut and made a decision. The rest was just hope and trust.
Reese: That means you did not test the sound logo before the launch?

Ewig: No. We don’t do pre-tests. I believe that pre-testing creates insecurity. When you are convinced of an idea, go for it and ask people how they like it afterward. That’s when you will get the real answers, the ones you can work with. If we had pre-tested the Saturn and Media Markt taglines, the most popular taglines in German advertising would have probably never made it to the public.

Reese: The Beatles probably wouldn’t have passed a pre-test either (laughs).

Ewig: We do carry out market research after the launch. We look at whether the melody is memorable, whether people find it annoying or too aggressive. We are now in the process of making adjustments based on that feedback.

Reese: Would you agree that we, as marketers, do not pay sound the respect that it deserves?

Ewig: I agree 150%. Most creative directors are visual people, hardly any of them has an in-depth understanding of brand sound. In agencies, you’ll find a creative director for every area but for sound. That role simply doesn’t exist. And I’m not trying to finger-point at agencies here – It’s us as clients who must demand such a role, but we don’t. So, yes, the importance of music is being underestimated completely.

Reese: Should brands apply the same discipline to auditive communication as they do to visual communication?

Ewig: Yes, without a doubt.

“I think it is keeping in mind that the word is “audio-visual”. It’s an interplay of sound and visual, two elements that should be designed to complement each other early on when planning a campaign.”

Reese: Then why do 90% of brands still not do it?

Ewig: Because of the lack of know-how and the fact that neither the agency nor the client side insist on it. Humans are wired to respond to visual communication. Studies have shown that people would rather be deaf than blind if they had to choose. Visual communication is very powerful.

Reese: In your opinion, what’s the most important thing when using sound in advertising?

Ewig: I think it is keeping in mind that the word is “audio-visual”. It’s an interplay of sound and visual, two elements that should be designed to complement each other early on when planning a campaign. Also, I cannot emphasize this enough: When you consider audio in advertising, make sure to consider the element of voice, as well. Voiceover is an incredibly powerful tool, especially for retail brands. Being meticulous about the choice of brand voice is crucial. With our last Saturn campaign, we put at least as much time and effort into finding the voice as into the rest of the campaign.

Copyright © 2020, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Alegra O’Hare, Vice President Global Brand Communications at adidas Originals.

“It’s much more about the culture of music versus just music by itself.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Alegra O’Hare, Vice President Global Brand Communications at adidas Originals.

“It’s much more about the culture of music versus just music by itself.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

Brand EDITION

Alegra O’Hare

Vice President Global Brand Communications at adidas Originals

 

“It’s much more about the culture of music versus
just music by itself.”



Alegra O’Hare, Vice President Global Brand Communications, adidas Originals

 

With 20 years of experience in marketing consumer goods for international companies such as the Sara Lee Corporation, Bang & Olufsen and VF Corporation, Alegra O’Hare is a true expert in brand communication. In 2007, she joined the adidas Group headquartered in Bavaria, Germany. In her most recent position as Vice President Global Brand Communications for adidas Originals, she leads the global marketing team that creates all consumer-facing content for the brand’s lifestyle division. She is responsible for the entire marketing creative campaigns, including the award-winning “Your Future Is Not Mine” and “My Way” entertainment pieces. In the 101GreatMinds interview, Alegra pulls back the curtain on the creative process and explains how Originals strives to be an authentic, young brand that inspires consumers to never stop challenging the status quo.

Reese: Can you talk a bit about your role at SAP?

O’Hare: To be honest, I think it’s pivotal. It can make a boring campaign amazing. It’s universal and consumers connect with it in an authentic and impactful way. I believe it’s one of the elements we don’t talk enough about. For decades we have seen all different types of music genres adopt our brand.  Music is rooted in our culture and has become part of our DNA, I mean we all have some sort of musical memory. Music can spark an emotion making it such an important element in creating meaningful bonds with consumers. If you can then attach it to campaign work, it can really turn it on its head.

Reese: Brands are in the trust-building business. Music is the direct way to the subconscious, where all buying decisions are made. How important is music in the consumer experience then?

Tillman: Our former CEO, Bill McDermott, always said that trust is earned in drops, but lost in buckets. As a marketer, that sentiment really speaks to me. Trust is personal and emotional and, at the end of the day, it’s the foundation of any stable and long-lasting relationship. If you don’t have trust, you essentially have nothing. Music can effortlessly transcend differences in geography and culture, and it’s a powerful form of expression that brands can and should make more use of to relate to consumers. Even though we are in the B2B business, we are selling to human beings. Through music, there’s an opportunity for brands to express themselves in a way that’s deeply human. I’ve always been a believer that music is an expression of values and beliefs. It can have a very special place when you are looking to tell your true story and connect with someone, especially when it reflects the brand identity in an authentic way. 

Reese: Even the greatest idea can feel very lonely at first. How do you know that it will connect with the consumer?

O’Hare: I don’t think there’s a magic formula. I believe the higher the risk, the higher the reward. To me, it’s important that anybody who engages with anything they see or hear from us as a brand has a point of view immediately. It could be love or hate, it doesn’t have to be love all the time (laughs). But that immediacy is very important, I think. You need to have that edge, that strength in the campaign that will spark an emotion. Nowadays we don’t have the luxury of time to convince consumers about the brand, so when you’re creating campaigning work, it has to be very surgical and precise. To be honest, with My Way, we weren’t quite sure that Frank Sinatra really resonated with the collective memory of individuals across the globe, especially with our young target consumers. We were using a very historical track and had to ask ourselves how to make sure that it resonated with a consumer that may not have even heard the song before.

Reese: And it does not seem as if you just bought yourself a license and slapped it onto the film. Could the way you treated this iconic piece be the audible three stripes? The thing where I can close my eyes and tell that it’s adidas Originals

O’Hare: Exactly, it’s the truth, reality and coherence with the brand’s ethos that you have to bring across with music. I think those days, when you tried to get credibility impact just by paying a lot of money for a track, are over. Our past has undeniably created a synergy with musical movements. As diverse as our product is, so are the genres that have adopted the brand. It was natural affinity and authentic association between music and the brand. The common thread between all the different types of artists is their expression of individuality and personal style. In essence it’s an exchange of shared values. Originals celebrates individuality, creativity and personal style and everything we do is reflective of this mind-set. This gives us the creative freedom to have a range of diversity in whatever we do.

Reese: With adidas, it seems like it’s more about law of attraction than promotion. What’s the secret?

O’Hare: We have been working with music for decades and I think it’s much more about the culture of music versus just music by itself. I believe that’s the key in everything we do. All brands try to work with music somehow but I think you really have to understand how meaningful the culture of music is in the culture of society. For adidas, music literally came to the brand. Our brand spoke to these seminal artists like Beastie Boys and Run DMC and it just became part of our DNA. We’ve always focused a lot on culture and tried to bring it into our work taking an authentic approach.

Reese: If you look at Your Future Is Not Mine and Original Is Never Finished from a musical point of view – could you pull back the curtain a little bit on how you guys got there?

O’Hare: With Your Future Is Not Mine, the music came to the forefront of the creative development. We constructed that music piece on purpose so it went much more hand in hand with the visual creative element. The music and the visual would complement each other creating a harmonious narrative. Instead, with the song My Way, it was more about the coordination of creativity and showcasing the campaign work. The decision to use the song was instantaneous. As soon as our creative agency proposed it, I knew it was perfect. There’s no other song that can embody this message and it strikes such a chord with Originals and what the brand stands for. We knew that if we used it, we had to include Frank’s voice from the original track as part of the remix. After all, we are always set out to do it our way.

Reese: What is so special about the collaboration with Johannes Leonardo from a musical point of view?

O’Hare: With every creative partnership we enter there has to be a shared set of values and respect for creative freedom, and our partnership with Johannes Leonardo is a perfect example of this. We’re constantly in contact and exchanging information, whether it’s the creative development or the musical element. When we talk together about music we really dive deep. We talk a lot about how music has changed over the years and how social platforms are evolving the concept of music. Social media has created a generation of composers, so, when we were talking about remixing a song as part of our campaign, we really needed to make sure that the result would be something exceptional – because of just the sheer volume of great music out there. We’re always looking to cut through the noise to find what works for us. There’s a lot more thought that goes into the musical aspect than 10 or 15 years ago, when it worked like “Oh that’s a great track, let’s use it for our advert”.

“You need to have that edge, that strength in the campaign that will spark an emotion.”

Reese: If there were an audio style guide for adidas Originals, what would it look like

O’Hare: With Originals, it’s always about challenging the status quo. Apart from that, the number one guidance that I would give is: Be real, Be truthful. Everybody tries to be authentic and unique but I think being truthful is a value that our consumers really connect with. They’re savvy, they can tell if something’s fake or if it’s just corporate and polished.

Reese: From your personal experience working on these incredible campaigns, is there some professional advice you can share

O’Hare: I think the most important thing, which is the hardest, is to take risks. Living in a corporate world, with an overwhelming responsibility towards the company, the brand, the people that are on your team, I think as a leader of the industry, you have to have the courage and confidence to take risks. I firmly believed that we needed Frank’s voice on the track because it’s part of the collective memory of music culture across the globe, and he was a true original – he was never finished. So sometimes you just have to be true to your ideas and go for it. Of course being in a high level position it’s difficult to take a chance, but in the end that’s part of the job as a leader. That mind-set trickles down, inspiring others to do the same. It’s so rewarding to be in a position empowering others to explore the limits and push the bounds of creativity, and it’s something I really believe in that is the key to success.

Copyright © 2020, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Alicia Tillman, Global CMO at SAP.

“Music is at the center of everything. It doesn’t matter how old you are or what you do, you will always connect music with emotions and memories.”
1024 1024 amp

amp 101 Great Minds interview with Alicia Tillman, Global CMO at SAP.

“Music is at the center of everything. It doesn’t matter how old you are or what you do, you will always connect music with emotions and memories.”

101 Great Minds on
Music, Brands and Behavior

BRAND EDITION

ALICIA TILLMAN

Global CMO at SAP

 

“Music is at the center of everything. It doesn’t matter how old you are or what you do, you will always connect music with emotions and memories.”

Alicia Tillman, Global CMO, SAP

 

Global Chief Marketing Officer at SAP, Alicia Tillman is responsible for creating and accelerating the company’s worldwide marketing strategy and brand recognition. Alicia is focused on driving the company vision of helping the world run better and improving people’s lives by building compelling, empathetic and creative marketing programs and campaigns. She has significant experience across marketing and product development, branding, lead generation, strategic planning, organizational design and innovation. Alicia has strong cultural competence leading global teams, is a dynamic public speaker, team motivator and has been honored by many organizations for her work in marketing and communications.

Reese: Can you talk a bit about your role at SAP?

Tillman: I’m the Global Chief Marketing Officer for SAP, a position I’ve held for almost three years now. It’s been an amazing journey working with our community of customers, partners and employees to tell our authentic SAP story. A big part of my role is capturing the voice of these stakeholders and ensuring that we’re building a narrative that reflects the real-life experiences and feelings they have as they engage with our brand. In today’s experience economy, companies and consumers choose brands emotionally – gut reactions mean everything. It’s not just about the product anymore, it’s about community and a sense of belonging. Marketing is taking the lead here, curating experiences that help earn customers for life, by asking hard questions: How do you architect once-in-a-lifetime experiences, learn from customer perspectives and deliver unexpected value? My job is to not only help people understand the business of SAP, but also to open their eyes to just how much we already impact their lives every day through technology. Ultimately, I’m accountable for telling that story in a meaningful way.

“I think it’s wonderful that music can create such transcending experiences and tap into our memories so effectively”

Reese: Brands are in the trust-building business. Music is the direct way to the subconscious, where all buying decisions are made. How important is music in the consumer experience then?

Tillman: Our former CEO, Bill McDermott, always said that trust is earned in drops, but lost in buckets. As a marketer, that sentiment really speaks to me. Trust is personal and emotional and, at the end of the day, it’s the foundation of any stable and long-lasting relationship. If you don’t have trust, you essentially have nothing. Music can effortlessly transcend differences in geography and culture, and it’s a powerful form of expression that brands can and should make more use of to relate to consumers. Even though we are in the B2B business, we are selling to human beings. Through music, there’s an opportunity for brands to express themselves in a way that’s deeply human. I’ve always been a believer that music is an expression of values and beliefs. It can have a very special place when you are looking to tell your true story and connect with someone, especially when it reflects the brand identity in an authentic way. 

Reese: I think a great example would be the James Bond soundtracks. Every person would recognize them, no matter if it`s a soundtrack from the 80s, 90s or only a couple of years ago.

Tillman: You are absolutely right. From a branding perspective, the Bond franchise’s use of music is iconic – the songs themselves are almost inseparable from the story the filmmakers are trying to convey. It’s perhaps the peak example of a brand that uses music with a strategic goal. Too often, I see a piece of media – a movie or an advertisement or a full marketing campaign – with a lack of clear intent or design. But if you look at the Bond films, there are certain elements that work together to build a cohesive and compelling narrative throughout each track. That matters because I can see the effort that goes into it, resulting in something that’s timeless. I think it’s wonderful that music can create such transcending experiences and tap into our memories so effectively. 

Reese: We are all born Mozarts. We have the ability to listen to a song and remember it decades later.

Tillman: Of the five senses, it’s taste and sound that are the most powerful triggers of memory. It’s the association that’s created between a specific sound and a positive feeling. If you danced with all your best friends at your high school prom, hearing that song reignites that feeling no matter how much time has passed. That’s just how our brains work.

Reese: Why is music not already more important in branding then?

Tillman: I think brands are under lot of pressure to differentiate. Marketers often think that differentiation should be most closely tied to telling a story of value. What does my product and service do for you that the competition can’t offer? But, when competition is so fierce, it’s experience that becomes the primary motivating factor for customers. If a consumer is shopping online for new headphones, there’s no shortage of options. But things like a seamless shopping cart or next-day shipping – consumers will happily pick the brand that makes the experience as easy and enjoyable as possible. That’s why I`m always asking myself, what are the ingredients in building a successful experience? And how can our brand and the products that we offer tie into that? Sometimes the answer is obvious and other times it’s not. As brands embrace the experience economy, music is going to take a bigger role, specifically in how it creates a red thread between all of the different experiences available to customers. It supports one coherent brand experience over time – and that presents a real opportunity for a brand to stand out.

Copyright © 2020, amp GmbH

Copyright regulations apply when using material from this document and when using the supplied video or audio files. This document is intended to be exclusively viewed by the recipient and its subsidiaries. Under no circumstances may the content or part of the content made available or forwarded in any form orally or in writing to third parties, in particular to competitors or affiliates. The publication, reproduction, distribution, reproduction or other utilization of the presented ideas, texts, layouts, concepts, films or audio files without express written permission by amp GmbH.

    Join our Newsletter

    We'll send you newsletters with news, tips & tricks. No spams here.

      Contact Us

      We'll send you newsletters with news, tips & tricks. No spams here.

        hotporno.cc Perfect natural tits splattered with creamy sperm - cumshot, teen, sex hotporno.cc My mom has a black cock fetish 280 - interracial, milf, mature hotporno.cc Lusty fucking at the kitchen - sex, cum, teen Hot babe mouth jizzed - blowjob, babe, hardcore Delightful brunette Gela B. does her best to cum - blowjob, teen, hardcore hotporno.cc hotporno.cc Hardcore anal sex. Anal creampie. Big tits wife - hardcore, sex, anal BLACK4K. Interracial coitus of rich babe and her black muscled coach - interracial, pornstar, teen hotporno.cc hotporno.cc